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#1 2020-09-10 06:14:27

NoeliaHens
Member
From: Germany, Deuerling
Registered: 2020-09-10
Posts: 1

Nov | Young Academics Workshop room 204

About.
Program   Schedule.
Speakers.
Registration.
Clash of Realities at gamesweekberlin.
Contact | Press.
Partners.
Archive.
About.
Program   Schedule.
Speakers.
Registration.
Clash of Realities at gamesweekberlin.
Contact | Press.
Partners.
Archive.
About.
For the tenth time, the Clash of Realities international research conference is providing the opportunity for interdisciplinary exchange and dialogue.
Experts from the academy, science and research, economics, politics, and the game industry will discuss pressing questions concerning the artistic design, technological development, and social perception of digital games, as well as the spreading of games literacy.
This conference welcomes scholars, social scientists, game developers, specialists in education and media, up-and-coming creative talents, students, and all those interested in and excited by digital games.
More than 50 international speakers from the academy, science and research, economics, politics and the game industry along with an enthusiastic audience will convene at the Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Science, a pillar of interdisciplinary exchange and dialogue.
The conference kick-off including the opening keynote will be followed by a day of summits featuring talks, project presentations, panel discussions, and workshops.
Finally, the main day of the Clash of Realities will feature renowned speakers from all around the globe.
As part of the tenth anniversary edition, the conference will also host the interactive touring exhibition „Games Culture in Germany.
Milestones“ by the Computerspielemuseum, which presents a selection of milestones in German games culture.
We are looking forward to welcoming you to the Cologne Game Lab of TH Köln in November 2019.
Photo Gallery.
November 19, 2019 – Conference Opening [here ]  Nember 20, 2019 – Summit Day [ here ]  November 21, 2019 – Main Conference Day [here ]                    Program.
November 19.

2019 – Conference Opening • Young Academics Workshop: Games

Play, Mental Health [more  ] • Conference Opening Event featuring a keynote by Jörg Friedrich   as well as a theatrical performance by the European Ensemble G.
I.
F.
T.
November 20, 2019 – Summit Day • Game Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games [more  ] • Media Education Summit: Digital Games and Children [more  ] • Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games [more  ] • History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past [more ] • Film and Games Summit: Crossing Boundaries in Narrative [more  ] November 21, 2019 – Main Conference Day Keynote Presentations: • Ian Bogost   • Maxime Durand   • Isabela Granic   • Johanna Koljonen   • Angela Schwarz  • Dylan Yamada-Rice      November 19 – 21, 2019 – Interactive touring exhibition by the Computerspielemuseum • Games Culture in Germany.
Milestones [here  ]                  Schedule.
All Topics.
19.
Nov | Conference Opening.
19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop.
20.
Nov | Film and Games Summit: Crossing Boundaries in Narrative.
20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
20.

Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games

20.

Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past

20.
Nov | Media Education Summit: Digital Games and Children.
21.
Nov | Keynotes on the Main Conference Day.
Expand All +             19.
Nov | Conference Opening.
The conference kick-off will include the opening keynote as well as the Young Academics Workshop.
18:00 – 18:00   Opening 10th Clash of Realities.
By Gundolf S.
Freyermuth Cologne Game Lab.

TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences

Björn Bartholdy Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences          Conference Opening     19.
Nov | Conference Opening.
17:00 – —   Registration opens.
Registration counter opens at the foyer of the Cinema Lecture Hall     19.
Nov | Conference Opening.
18:40 – 19:25   Opening Keynote: „YOU DO HAVE RESPONSIBILITY…“.
By Jörg Friedrich Paintbucket Games           How games trivialize fascism, why this should concern us and how we could change it.
This lecture aims to shed light on the long and pop culturally interwoven history of digital games, historical fascism and authoritarian thinking.
It will show how the way historical Fascism is portrayed in video games is often dangerous and wrong, why we need to change it and how this can be achieved.
1.
How it is wrong Most games fail on a fundamental level when they portray historical Nazism because they are: – Reducing historical fascism to the military aspects of World War Two – Skipping the slow rise of authoritarianism in the early 1930ies – Using tropes like the “brave and honourable German soldier in WW2” – Repeating and imitating fascist aesthetics – Leaving out the persecution and murder of Jews and other groups 2.
Why this should bother us As game developers we should realize that our creations form and change human culture.
– Neo-Nazis build their communities around games that don’t challenge their revisionist histories.
– Gamer Gate worked as a blueprint for later similar Alt-Right and Pro-Trump-groups.
– Games must learn to deal with critical topics responsibly if they want to be equally valuable as movies or books.
3.
How to change it Games need to take responsibility when portraying such critical parts of history as the historical Nazi-Fascism: – Developers need to look out for different views outside of war and military.
– We need to incorporate civilian perspectives and destinies into our game medium – We carefully choose our aesthetics and avoid fascist tropes and aesthetics.
– Taking a stance – Making games post Christchurch – there is no neutral stance when it comes to hate.
19.
Nov | Conference Opening.
16:15 – 17:00   Bridging Developmental Science and Game Design to Create Video Games for Mental Health.
By Isabela Granic Radboud University          Depression and anxiety are the most frequently diagnosed mental health problems, leading to devastating long-term outcomes that affect a huge proportion of children and adolescents across the globe.
Effective prevention programs that show more than a small effect size and that do not stigmatize, condescend to, and bore children, are urgently needed.
Our research program focuses on developing evidence-based games that promote emotional resilience through training skills while youth are immersed in games they love to play.
We prioritize design and art, integrate developmental science and principles of behavioral change, and systematically test our gaming interventions with large-scale randomized controlled trials.
In this talk I will: (a) describe the cross-disciplinary framework we use to develop mobile and virtual reality games that integrate biofeedback and evidence-based game mechanics, (b) present data from a series of randomized controlled trials that evaluate games that use biofeedback at their core (e.g., EEG neurofeedback, heart rate); and (c) introduce a roadmap to the next five years of programmatic studies in biofeedback games, emphasizing how our design and research methodology can help establish a validated toolbox of mechanics relevant to a wide range of interventions and mental health domains.
19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
16:00 – 16:15   Short Break.
Short break     19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
15:45 – 16:00   Panel Discussion.
By Carman Ng University of Bremen, Mehmet Kosa Tilburg University, Nils Bühler University of Cologne          Panel 3 – Effects     19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
15:20 – 15:45   Nevermind: Playing with Trauma and Affects.
By Carman Ng University of Bremen          This presentation illustrates mixed-method empirical analyses of trauma-themed independent games, to support theorizing dynamics among embodiment, multimodality, and meaning-making in designing digital games for mental health.
Multimodality explores how communication involves combining various expressive resources effectively, such as visuals, language, sound, music, and haptics.
In digital gameplay, meaning traverses technical materiality, bodies, and worlds (Keogh 2018).
This emphasizes how the body crucially constitutes the mind, meaning, and communication, as substantially explored in embodied cognition (Gallagher 2015); and the importance to expand approaches in the humanities to examine affects in media encounters (Genosko 2016).
In this presentation, I discuss findings from an ongoing research on games that engage such phenomena as loss, grief, war, and mental illness, with the illustrative case of Nevermind (Flying Mollusk 2016) – a psychological thriller featuring motifs of psychological trauma and biofeedback sensitivity to foster player mindfulness and mood management.
Motivating my research is the aim to explore how digital games can constructively engage with mental health by cohering gameplay mechanics, narrative motifs, multimodal aesthetics, and forms of interpretive and affective difficulty (Jagoda 2018).
Analyses combine player experiments (with affect-sensing equipment) and corpus-based game analyses, to triangulate embodied data and fine-grained multimodal patterns.
Latest endeavors in multimodality research emphasize interdisciplinary, empirical work and intrinsic contributions of embodied responses to meaning (Bateman 2019; Bateman, Wildfeuer, and Hiippala 2017).
In this regard, my analyses correlate multimodal patterns and players’ affective responses at significant gameplay moments, in relation to higher-order design strategies.
Specifically, discussion details how Nevermind, and selected games from my corpora, experiment with player agency, witnessing and complicity, as well as ludonarrative dissonance; while eliciting diverse, complex effects, such as calm, relief, alienation, unease, and anxiety.
Guiding this presentation is the aim to motivate game designs and research that explore mental health and resilience beyond gamification.
19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
14:55 – 15:20   4 Pillars of Healthy Escapism in Games.
By Mehmet Kosa Tilburg University          Escapism is usually defined as avoidance of the real.
Digital games are conducive to escapism because they take place in a temporally and spatially bounded virtual space that is separated from the real.
Moreover, games contain artificial conflicts and actions that have no effect on real life.
Digital games are also available on a broad range of devices (i.e.
desktop, mobile, VR), making them an easily accessible platform for escapism in daily life.
Consequently, escapism is one of the most common reasons for playing digital games.
However, escapism generally has a negative connotation.
Escapism was found to be associated with negative outcomes such as problematic use and excessive gaming.
Nevertheless, games can also be beneficial depending on how escapism is operationalized.
For instance, research shows that mental disengagement via video games was shown to provide recovery experiences such that it helps players to decrease their stress levels and provide relaxation after stressful activities (e.g.
work).
Escapism can also act as a mood management strategy, as people tend to play games to avoid negative mood states and induce positive mood states.
Similarly, escapism in games can be beneficial for practicing emotion regulation strategies.
Finally, games can also provide a healthy form of coping strategy for some players.
In short, escapism can have both negative and positive consequences, depending on how it is defined.
Consequently, it is important to demarcate what constitutes a healthy escapism versus subversive escapism.
19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
14:30 – 14:55   Censoring Video Games Through a Youth Protection Pretext.
By Nils Bühler University of Cologne          The Jugendschutzgesetz (JuSchG, youth protection law) allows for an exception of the otherwise strict restraints on censorship in Germany.
The responsible authorities maintain a list – often simply called the “Index” – with media that, in their estimation, are harmful to the healthy development of children (JuSchG §15 Art.
2 Nr.
5, §18 Satz 1).
Media on this list must not be made available to children in any way, be advertised or sold openly.
Reviewing the decisions on games of the Bundesprüfstelle für jugendgefährdende Schriften (BPjS, the federal inspection authority for youth corrupting publications) of the 1980s uncovers how political, religious and elitist opinions shape what is considered harmful to the mental health of children and how the power to rule what is deemed harmful can have repercussions on the image of a medium.
Politically charged games, for example Raid over Moscow, do not seem to have an impact on the psychology of children that differs from other games of the time, but the BPjS still deemed them to cause cramps, anger, aggressive behaviour, nervousness, difficulty in concentration and headaches (cf.
Mühlbauer 2010).
The decisions of the BPjS represent the relationship between games and the government as well as the political parties involved at that time.
Studying the index therefore can provide a contextualizing overview of the relationship of politics and games as well as stigmata of games as mental health hazards.
19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
13:30 – 14:30   Lunch Break.
Lunch break     19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      —.
13:15 – 13:30   Panel Discussion.
By Leonie Wolf Flying Sheep Studios | Cube Factory GbR | Cologne Game Lab, Natali Panic-Cidic RWTH Aachen University, Rogerio Augusto Bordini Offenburg University of Applied Sciences | Helmut Schmidt University          Panel 2 – Design     19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
12:50 – 13:15   The role of VR in game therapy.
By Leonie Wolf Flying Sheep Studios | Cube Factory GbR | Cologne Game Lab          Since the 1990’s researchers have been developing virtual reality systems to treat phobias.
This form of exposure therapy proved to be quite successful and raised the question which other anxiety- and mental health disorders could be treated with VR.
Looking at the current research on game therapy, virtual reality systems are used frequently to enhance the psycho- therapeutic effect of therapy games.
But what exactly does VR add to the success.
In the Young Academics Workshop, I want to explore the way virtual reality systems for mental health therapy can positively affect the therapeutic process.
Looking at a brief history of the use of VR in the mental health sector, I want to further investigate the advantages and disadvantages of this tool regarding game therapy.
19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
12:25 – 12:50   Digital Fictions: Towards Designing Narrative-Driven Games as Therapy.
By Natali Panic-Cidic RWTH Aachen University          In this years’ talk, I want to introduce the benefits and possibilities of using digital fiction for narrative-driven games, especially its usage in the project “Writing New Bodies: Critical Co-design for 21st Century Digital-born Bibliotherapy”.
This project addresses body image concerns and consequent psychological problems young women and women identified individuals are facing every day.
The goal of “Writing New Bodies” is to develop a narrative-based, interactive story game application that can be used as an intervention method in therapy for body image issues.
Digital fiction is an interactive form of storytelling and it only exists in its digital form (Bell et al.
2018, Ensslin et al.
2019, Bell et al.
2010).
While some digital fictions are text-based, such as Depression Quest, there are 3D digital fictions such as Wallpaper or Inkubus that are multimodal in their nature (Ensslin et al.
2019).
Overall, digital fictions are highly suitable for game developers who want to design narrative-driven projects.
This is because they can provide a platform to deal with difficult topics (depression, suicide, body image issues) in an artistically appropriate and matter sensitive way.
“Writing New Bodies” is a digital fiction app built in cooperative co-design iterations dealing with such a sensitive topic.
First, I will explain what digital fictions are.
Second, to point out how digital fiction games can be used in therapy, I will introduce the methodology of the “Writing New Bodies” project and bibliotherapy as one of its intended usage options.
Finally, I will conclude by giving an outlook for further research.
19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
11:30 – 12:00   Short Break.
Short break     19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
11:15 – 11:30   Panel Discussion.
By Miruna Vozaru IT University of Copenhagen, Arno Görgen Bern University of the Arts, Stefan H.
Simond Philipps-University Marburg, .

Anh-Thu Nguyen University of Cologne          Panel 1 – Representation     19

Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
10:50 – 11:15   Mindspaces in PERSONA 5 Mental Health as a Space of Play.
By Anh-Thu Nguyen University of Cologne          While the success of JRPG PERSONA 5 (2016) may surely be attributed to its densely packed socio-political commentary on contemporary issues within Japan, it also portrays the struggles of high schoolers who are dealing with mental health.
This begins with the protagonist who is falsely accused of a crime and bullied at his new school, leading to classmates who are mentally and sexually abused by their teacher, culminating into a suicide attempt by one of the victims.
In addition to the story, the game eventually introduces the spatial exploration of mental illness.
Although one half of the game is typically set in modern-day Tokyo, the other half takes place in what the game calls the ‘metaverse’ with conquerable ‘palaces’, a physical manifestation of mental corruption.
The protagonist’s party usually target corrupt people in power and their palaces with the goal of changing their mental state.
One exception in the series of targeted palaces is that of teenager Futaba Sakura, whose palace is not as much of a manifestation of corruption, but one created through self-destructive desires.
The palace is a spatial representation of her mental state and as the party advances, her depression as well as suicidal thoughts are revealed.
The palaces of the metaverse can be understood as ‘mindspaces’.
Although the term has had a wide application in literature studies particularly within the science fiction and fantasy genre (Slusser and Rabkin 1989), mindspaces have become popularised in films such as INCEPTION (2010) or the television series SHERLOCK (2010-2017).
However, they are understood as cognitive spatial constructs.
Borrowing from film and television studies then, the focus will lie on cognitive spaces, or “Erinnerungsräume” (Beil 2010) in Persona 5.
This project seeks to widen the scope of research for interactive spaces that includes mental and cognitive aspects of game design.
19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
09:45 – 10:00   Welcome and Introduction.
By Curtis L.
Maughan Vanderbilt University, Michael S.
Debus Independent Researcher, Federico Alvarez Igarzábal Institute for Frontier Areas of Psychology and Mental Health, Su-Jin Song Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences          Welcome to the Young Academics Workshop     19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
10:25 – 10:50   Characters in the Game Situation The Concept of the Parallel Actor.
By Miruna Vozaru IT University of Copenhagen          The portrayal of the mental health and state of videogame characters has a long history, from gamified sanity meters, to more recent, mature approaches that explore the experiences of neuroatypical individuals in a responsible and instructive manner.
This evolution brings about several questions regarding the portrayal of the mental state of an entity lacking autonomy, found predominantly under player control.
For a genuine portrayal of matters concerning mental health, characters must surpass their role of mechanical and informational conduits and assume autonomy within the mechanical layer of the game, as doing so will not only individualize them within the context of the game’s heterocosm, but also in the game situation (Eskelinen, 2001).
To gage the possibility of this metamorphosis, I have qualitatively analysed the video game The Missing: J.
J.
Macfield and the island of memories (White Owls Inc., 2018) guided by the proposal made by Actor-Network Theory that non-humans can exert an undirected agency over the status quo (Latour, 2008, p.
70-86).
It follows that both sources of direct and indirect action as well as modifiers, enablers, and constrainers of action have been coded and examined.
The resulting analysis grants an overview of the diffusion of action control through the network enabling both the analysis of the centrality of participants in the diffusion of agency, as well as the roles that the player character takes in the game situation.
Through the study, the emergence of the player character as a parallel agent, functioning alongside the player, in the player-game relationship becomes discernable as we witness J.
J.
accepting herself, and assuming control over herself, and away from external sources.
Within the game situation, this translates to taking control over a central mechanic, regeneration, which has so far been under the player’s control.
With this, her understanding of her mental state, and retaking of control is contextualized in her emergence as an individual, not only within the bounds of the game heterocosm, but also within the game situation.
19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
10:00 – 10:25   Towards A Typology of Pixelated Madness.
By Arno Görgen Bern University of the Arts, Stefan H.
Simond Philipps-University Marburg          Mental illnesses have long since been an integral part of popular culture.
As a field of interdiscourse (Link 1996, 50), popular culture picks up on scientific findings, social norms and ideals and the respective othering of the mentally ill as deviants.
Digital games are no exception to this.
Their constructions of mental illnesses range from stigmatising tropes in horror psychiatries to attempts of (self-)empowerment in autopathographic games.
As the focus when analysing digital games and mental health has for a long time primarily rested upon potential media effects, the intricate and increasingly diversified constructions of mental illness within the game texts have largely flown under the radar.
While the construction of mental illness in other forms of mass media, such as television or movies, has been studied and criticised with increasing persistence since the 1990s,1 there are few quantitative and qualitative studies that primarily focus on constructions of mental health in digital games.
Drawing from a currently ongoing PhD project as well as previous conjunct research, we are working on a typology with the goal to make constructions of mental illness in digital games accessible for analysis.
Based on individual interpretations, i.e.
deep readings, of games such as The Sims 4 (Maxis 2014), Amnesia: Dark Descent (Frictional Games 2010), Outlast (Red Barrels 2013), Depression Quest (Zoë Quinn, Patrick Lindsey, Isaac Schankler 2013), The Town of Light (LKA 2016), and Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice (Ninja Theory 2017) we wish to propose six types and elaborate upon their relevance in our talk: (1) quantification, (2) objectification, (3) subjectification, (4) somatic externalisation, (5) spatial externalisation and (6) actional externalisation.
These categories are not exclusive and in itself interconnected.
In this context, we understand illnesses in games as “functional disruptions” (Görgen 2017), as productive elements serving a narrative and ludic structure.
Our goal in mind is to reach an overarching understanding of how the construction of mental illness in digital games works and to which degree it ties in with medical epistemology, social discourse and popular culture in a broad sense.
19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
12:00 – 12:25   A Gamified Social App to Combat Loneliness and Social Isolation among Young Adults with Depression.
By Rogerio Augusto Bordini Offenburg University of Applied Sciences | Helmut Schmidt University          A report from the World Economic Forum (2019) stated loneliness as the third societal stressor in the world, which is on the rise particularly in the West.
This psychological strain, which was recently classified as harmful as smoking 15 cigarettes a day and more dangerous than obesity (CIGNA, 2018), can also increase the risk of depression and other mental disorders, which can lead to increased severity of the condition due to negative impacts on physical, mental and social health (Cacioppo et al.
2002; Hawkley et al.
2003).
Digital technology, specifically mental health apps (MHapps), has been viewed as promising solutions, however, little evidence on this topic reveals uncertainty around how technological solutions impact individual well-being.
This work aims to investigate how a gamified social mobile app can reduce the social isolation and loneliness of young adults by bringing them into an online community of local users who will be able to communicate and help each other both online and in real life based on their geolocation.
Furthermore, as little work has focused on digital apps to reduce loneliness, this project also proposes to describe and discuss the design process of the app Gratitude (Web and mobile), which its first version is being developed following a set of recommendations for designing high-efficacy mental health mobile apps (Chandrashekar, 2018; Bakker et al.
2016), gamification for mental health (Fleming et al.
2017) and loneliness reduction interventions (Masi et al.
2011).
By considering these guidelines, the app also aims to create social opportunities and improve users‘ social skills through a quest-based gamified system in order to encourage conversations and develop empathy.
The problem identification, the design process of low and high-fidelity prototypes and the methods to evaluate usability and the processes of peer evaluation will be presented.
19.
Nov | Young Academics Workshop      room 204.
20:30 – 22:00   Exhibition Opening.
„Games Culture in Germany.
Milestones“ – An interactive touring exhibition by the Computerspielemuseum     19.
Nov | Conference Opening      Open Space.
19:30 – 20:30   Theater performance „Momentum Nostrum“ by the G.
I.
F.
T.
theatre ensemble.
„Momentum Nostrum“ is an absurd, oversubscribed fairground event with a kind of master of ceremonies leading through the evening respectively a fair.
In the course of the play, this character is unmasked as a figure or instance that plays power games.
The questions almost inevitably arise: Why do we actually „play“ war.
And why does everyone, including the audience, play along.
Or will the audience be able to give the spectacle another twist through interaction.
19.
Nov | Conference Opening.
18:10 – 18:40   Welcome Address.
Welcome Addresses by Prof.
Dr.
Stefan Herzig (President of TH Köln), Andreas Wolter (Mayor of the City of Cologne), Hans van den Heuvel (Consul, Consulate General of the Kingdom of the Netherlands Duesseldorf) and Till Hardy (Film und Medienstiftung NRW).
19.
Nov | Conference Opening.
20.
Nov | Summit Day.
The Summit Day will feature talks, project presentations, panel discussions, and workshops.
.
15:45 – 16:00   Short Break.
short coffee break     20.
Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games      —.
09:00 – —   Registration opens.
Registration counter opens on the 2nd floor of CGL     20.
Nov | Film and Games Summit: Crossing Boundaries in Narrative  20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games  20.
Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games  20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past       Foyer at the 2nd floor of CGL.
13:00 – 13:30   Panel.
By Hanns Christian Schmidt Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences, Katarzyna Marak Nicholaus Copernicus University, Jan Švelch Tampere University , Ian Bogost Georgia Institute of Technology, Benjamin Beil University of Cologne, Gundolf S.
Freyermuth Cologne Game Lab, .

TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences          Panel discussion     20
Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games      room 204

15:00 – 15:45   Flawed, forgotten, fascinating: How the Stay Forever podcast explores irrelevant games, and what we can learn from them (+Q&As).
By Christian Schmidt Stay Forever, Gunnar Lott Stay Forever          In 2016, Stay Forever – Germany’s leading retro games podcast – introduced a side-project: Over the course of several weeks, the hosts Gunnar and Christian would individually play an obscure old game from the vast body of works that, well, didn’t exactly make it into the list of timeless classics.
During this time, the two would meet every week to discuss their progress and reflect on their play experience.
Pretty soon, this little experiment turned into a full-fledged series of expeditions into the scrapyards of gaming history, where we discovered that one person’s trash is another’s – our –treasure.
Join us for an entertaining exhibition of the curious and enlightening artifacts that we brought back from these trips, which, through their existence, expand our understanding of the medium.
20.
Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games      room 204.
10:30 – 11:30   Keeping Memory Alive through Digital Games.
By Jörg Friedrich Paintbucket Games          The questions on how history will be made available to future generations are still to be answered.
Digital games enable users to become an active part in historical-like situation with an unprecedented intensity.
Individual experiences can exceed the effect from ‚classical‘ history lessons.
Ultimately, digital games are very likely to have a significant impact on what is understood by history and how historical understanding is culturally passed on.
The question is: How.
How can real memories find their way into a medium, which allows recipients to create their own stories.
What methods can be used to fulfill players’ need for agency, while keeping true to the topic.
How can game mechanics be used to enhance the understanding for a historical situation.
How can video games contribute to building and sustaining a culture of remembrance.
How can entertainment and a critical reflection of the past be balanced.
During this session I will try to discuss and answer these questions and discuss history through games in general and in “Through the Darkest of Times” in particular.
20.

Nov | Film and Games Summit: Crossing Boundaries in Narrative      room 104 (ifs)

16:00 – 16:15   Short Break.
Short break     20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
17:15 – 18:00   Closing Panel.
By Maddalena Grattarola Space Backyard, Ilja Burzev Freelance | Slow Bros.
, Ulrich Götz Zurich University of the Arts, Rikke Jansen VR Artist and developer          Panel Discussion     20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
15:30 – 16:00   Virtual Bauhaus.
By Ilja Burzev Freelance | Slow Bros.
On the occasion of the Bauhaus 100th anniversary, the Goethe-Institut presents Virtual Bauhaus, an exhibition on the German school of art and design using the medium of virtual reality.
Taking place within the school building in Dessau, constructed in 1925–26 according to designs by the school’s first director Walter Gropius, Virtual Bauhaus offers visitors a one-of-a-kind experience, transporting them into the architectural space of the building as it existed in the 1920s.
Through this immersive environment visitors explore the school’s central ideas through encounters with its architecture, people and objects.
The project was created by Cologne Game Lab commissioned by Goethe Institut Boston.
From the first feasibility study in 2017 until its release in 2019 the application went through serveral stages of development.
The project lead and artist Ilja Burzev will talk about the creation process of this interactive exhibition.
20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
16:45 – 17:15   Mundane narratives for liminal spaces: Like Roots in the Soil and Bird of Passage.
By Maddalena Grattarola Space Backyard          At Space Backyard, as game makers, we like to encode the granularity of the everyday in our stories, and to suspend both the protagonist and the player in the liminal spaces we provide for them to explore.
This talk will analyse the design process behind the creation of such spaces in Like Roots in the Soil and Bird of Passage, retracing the steps we took to balance out specific narratives and tailored game mechanics.
While in the first game the landscape encompassed by a split diorama guarantees a clear context to a voluntarily vague text, in the second case it is the text that transforms the darkness of the surrounding environment into something incredibly detailed and recognisable.
Both techniques aim at offering a canvas for the player to fill with their own ideas, interpretations and scattered memories.
20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
12:15 – 13:00   Morning Panel.
By Vít Šisler Charles University, Yasaman Farazan Independent Game Developer, Milan Pingel Massive Miniteam, Brooke Maggs Narrative Designer | Remedy Entertainment, Katharina Tillmanns Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences          Panel discussion     20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
11:15 – 11:45   Historical Accuracy vs Player’s Agency: Designing Videogames on Contested Past.
By Vít Šisler Charles University          This talk will critically analyze the challenges and limitations of designing serious videogames on contested past.
In particular, it will discuss the tensions between maintaining historical accuracy and player’s agency, authenticity and fiction, and narrative and gameplay.
The talk stems from the speaker’s experience of being a lead game designer of Attentat 1942, a narrative game that tells the story of Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia from the perspective of those who experienced it firsthand.
The game was critically acclaimed and received several awards, including the Most Amazing Game at the 2018 A MAZE.
festival.
Furthermore, the talk will discuss the upcoming game Svoboda 1945 that deals with the WWII aftermath, including the expulsion of Sudeten Germans from Czechoslovakia and the rise of communism to power.
From a broader perspective, the talk also explores the role professional historians play in a historical videogame design and development.
20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
12:15 – 14:00   Lunch.
Lunch break          —.
11:45 – 12:15   Mid-Mortem Interview: Beethoven – Follow the Music.
By Yasaman Farazan Independent Game Developer, Milan Pingel Massive Miniteam           „Beethoven – Follow the Music“ is an AR game in which you trace the melodies of various Beethoven pieces through the movements of your phone.
After winning the Beethoven-themed Game Jam held at Cologne Game Lab in early 2019, creative director Yasaman Farazan and her team collaborated with Massive Miniteam to further develop the prototype for the public-broadcasting institution WDR.
The full release will be this December on Google Play and the iOS Appstore to celebrate the 250th birthday of Beethoven in 2020.
In this mid-mortem a few weeks before release, producer Milan Pingel will interview Yasaman Farazan about the challenges encountered when developing a game about experiencing classical music.
Together, they will take a deep dive into the design process of the game and elaborate on the iteration of visual feedback mechanisms, tools design and user feedback testing by showing elements and pictures from various stages of the development process.
Questions from the audience are very welcome and everyone is invited to try out the game after the talk.
20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
11:30 – 12:00   Historical research for and authenticity in the Assassin’s Creed series.
By Maxime Durand Ubisoft Montreal          Maxime will speak about the historical research work for Assassin’s Creed with with several examples and comments on the relevance of historical choices in Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed games.
20.

Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past      room 211

13:00 – 15:00   Lunch Breack.
Lunch Break     20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games      tba.
11:00 – 11:15   Short Break.
Short break     20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
14:30 – 15:00   Play and Counterplay: Toying with Authenticity.
By Angus Mol Leiden University Centre for Digital Humanities | VALUE Foundation          In this paper I will explore how various forms of counterplay, an opposing or contrasting action or move within a game, defines our relation to authenticity in video games.
While it may be hard to agree on what authenticity in contemporary playgrounds based on the past even means, looks like, and how it can function, playful resistance to authenticity can provide a window into our complex relation with it.
I first started thinking about the foundational role of counterplay after experiencing how a participant of RoMeincraft, a crowdbased Minecraft reconstruction of the Dutch Roman borders, populated an entire fort with polar bears.
The notion that we frequently toy around with ‘authentic’ histories goes beyond such virtual reconstructions.
It is, for example, also at the basis of the what-if histories we find in games like Sid Meier’s Civilization and Europa Universalis or in the history re-telling of Where the Water Tastes like Wine, 80 days and The Tearoom.
Counterplay starts before play itself, as it can rovide ammunition in the ‘arena of authenticity’ that needs to be mediated by historical game designers in response to their target audience before the game even launches.
We see play and counterplay in game design everywhere: from the euphemistic, ‘Civ is meant to be fun’ politics of Sid Meier, to the backlash against the ‘inauthentic’ avatar choices and designs in Battlefield V, and the heated debate around the ‘whitewashing’ of mediaeval history in Kingdom Come: Deliverance and Mordhau.
In short, while often placed at the core of historic game experiences, perhaps one of the main points of authenticity is that it is more interesting to play counter to it.
20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past      room 211.
14:45 – 15:45   Panel.
By Ömer Alkin Filmmaker & Media and Cultural Studies Scholar, Hayriye Kapusuz Istanbul University, Gerhard Maier Journalist | Editor | co-founder Seriencamp | founder Plot, Johanna Koljonen Participation Design Agency, Joachim Friedmann ifs – internationale filmschule köln          Panel Discussion.
Moderation: Joachim Friedmann     20.
Nov | Film and Games Summit: Crossing Boundaries in Narrative      room 104 (ifs).
12:30 – 13:45   Lunch Break.
Lunch break     20.
Nov | Film and Games Summit: Crossing Boundaries in Narrative.
10:00 – 10:30   Intro/Welcome.
By Joachim Friedmann ifs – internationale filmschule köln          Introduction to the Film & Games Summit     20.
Nov | Film and Games Summit: Crossing Boundaries in Narrative      room 104 (ifs).
11:30 – 12:30   Clash of Neo-Ottoman Realities in Turkish TV shows.
By Ömer Alkin Filmmaker & Media and Cultural Studies Scholar, Hayriye Kapusuz Istanbul University          Media productions and the way of reworking history reflect both in form and content the current political and cultural character/ideology of the government.
The trend of conservatism all around the world can be observed in each area of life.
Also Turkey is confronted with a strengthening of conservative (Muslim) political forces that form the government now.
The rise of Neo-Ottoman TV-shows presenting the Ottoman past in a phantasmatic and idealizing way corresponds with these political developments in Turkey and at the same time supports und reproduces the ideological agenda of the government.
The presentation will show the historical, narrative and aesthetic complexity of the genre.
It will reflect upon the ideological effects of the narrative-immersive qualities of the shows and at the same time it will discuss the various social receptions.
20.
Nov | Film and Games Summit: Crossing Boundaries in Narrative      room 104 (ifs).
13:45 – 14:45   Storytelling in Full Agency Worlds.
By Johanna Koljonen Participation Design Agency          Nordic Larp is a decades long game design tradition creating serious immersive experiences, which demand role taking from the participants and offer full narrative agency in return.
Played in gallery spaces, historic castles, city streets, and classrooms, exploring storyworlds for art, entertainment, or education, these larps essentially construct virtual realities in analog spaces.
To allow participants narrative freedom while telling satisfying and even profound stories, the designers, world builders and writers of this medium have solved many challenges that writers for Transmedia IPs, VR, and other immersive platforms are only now starting to identify.
This talk discusses how to approach writing from a perspective beyond character psychology, constructing thematically coherent interaction machines that generate infinite story possibilities, and how achieving this goal is as much a question of paratext as of fiction.
20.
Nov | Film and Games Summit: Crossing Boundaries in Narrative      room 104 (ifs).
16:15 – 17:15   Panel: the politics of authenticity.
By Angus Mol Leiden University Centre for Digital Humanities | VALUE Foundation, Esther Wright University of Warwick , Eugen Pfister Bern University of the Arts, Felix Zimmermann a.r.t.e.s.

Graduate School for the Humanities Cologne          Panel discussion

Moderation: Felix Zimmermann     20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past      room 211.
16:45 – 17:00   Short Break.
Short break     20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past      room 211.
15:30 – 15:45   Short Break.
Short break     20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past      room 211.
13:00 – 14:30   Lunch break.
Lunch break     20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past.
12:00 – 13:00   Panel: Producing the authentic.
By Maxime Durand Ubisoft Montreal, Adam Chapman University of Gothenburg, Angela Schwarz University of Siegen, Felix Zimmermann a.r.t.e.s.
Graduate School for the Humanities Cologne          Panel discussion.
Moderation: Felix Zimmermann     20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past      room 211.
11:15 – 11:30   Coffee Break.
short break     20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past      room 211.
10:00 – 10:15   Introduction: Some theses on authenticity in Digital Games.
By Felix Zimmermann a.r.t.e.s.
Graduate School for the Humanities Cologne, Martin Lorber Electronic Arts          Introduction to the History in Games Summit     20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past      room 211.
16:45 – Open End   Get Together and Game Demos.
tba          room 106 (ifs).
15:00 – 15:15   Short Break.
Short break          tba.
11:45 – 12:15   Panel Discussion.
By Dylan Yamada-Rice Royal College of Art, Jasmin Bastian University of Mainz, Stefan Aufenanger University of Mainz          Panel discussion          room 106 (ifs).
10:00 – 10:15   Opening Remarks.
By Friederike Siller.

Institute for Media Research and Media Education

TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences          Introduction to the Media Education Summit: Digital Games and Children          room 106 (ifs).
13:30 – 15:00   Lunch break.
Lunch break     20.
Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games.
16:30 – 17:00   [Para]Textually here – Paratexts and Presence in Games.
By Ed Vollans University of Leicester           ‘Not Game Footage’, ‘Coming soon’, ‘only on selected platforms’.
These phrases often found within paratextual promotion serve to create a distinction between the (forthcoming) text, and the (present) paratext.
Yet as media scholars elsewhere have noted, product experience is multifaceted, and can begin prior to, and separate from the text itself (Chin & Gray; 2001, Heath 1977).
Our awareness of texts, including videogames, is heavily mediated, curated and framed by a promotional and paratextual surround – as Consalvo noted, gameplay ‘does not exist in a vacuum’ (2007, 176).
Elsewhere, Couldry (2000) has called for definitions of the text to extend beyond the boundaries of finite individual elements, into that which audiences consider to be a discrete unified whole.
This throws the onus of textual definition onto the perceived relationship between different elements and offering up the possibility of considering the game text as an assemblage of textual experiences, echoing the work of T.
L Taylor (2009).
Yet despite developments to the paratextual ontology debate in other fields, game studies scholars still frequently affirm a binary between text and paratext.
By focusing on game trailers, this paper explores the ways in which paratexts present, and represent the game itself.
It draws on the work of Genette (1987), Johnston (2009), Gray (2010), Vollans (2014; 2017), and Barker (2017) to synthesise a framework grounded within examples that better allow us to see how these trailers function at an intertextual level, and offers audience-centred consideration of textual experiences.
Ultimately, this paper argues that game paratexts are as much a part of the game as the act of play, and that just as games are an assemblage, so too are they an assemblage of textual experiences.
It resultantly makes the case for a dedicated shift in games studies to explore the textual assemblage rather than paratextual divide.
20.
Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games      room 204.
11:30 – 12:00   Short Break.
Short break     20.
Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games      room 204.
10:15 – 11:30   Keynote: The Paratext Is The Game (+Q&As).
By Ian Bogost Georgia Institute of Technology          tba     20.
Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games      room 204.
10:00 – 10:15   Intro/Welcome.
By Benjamin Beil University of Cologne, Gundolf S.
Freyermuth Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences          Introduction to the Game Studies Summit     20.
Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games      room 204.
12:30 – 13:00   Letsplay recording as an important research tool in close reading of digital game texts.
By Katarzyna Marak Nicholaus Copernicus University          This paper is devoted to the unique ways specific paratexts, namely letsplays, contribute to the generating of academic knowledge about digital game texts.
The main focus of the paper concerns the valuable information a scholar can obtain from letsplay recordings, which would otherwise be inaccessible if they relied exclusively on the process of critically playing the game.
The academic interest in letsplays as paratexts and their potential is on the increase (Mukherjee 2015, Burwell and Miller 2016, Enevold and Stewart 2015), and they are recognized as a source of insight into how the game can be played in terms of skill, strategy and interpretation of content (Newman 2013, RaddeAntweiler and Zeiler 2015).
Since letsplays are a peculiar type of paratexts which concentrate specifically on the player experience (Marak and Markocki 2016), they can supply the scholar with extensive data which might not otherwise be apparent to them during their own critical playthrough (Bizzocchi and Tanenbaum 2011), thus reducing the likelihood of potential blindspots in the subsequent analysis.
By including in their research the letsplays of the analyzed game, the scholar can not only explore elements of the personal gameplay experience of other players, but also learn about relevant cultural and linguistic limitations of the game, as well as numerous aspects of local agency (Harrel in Lewis and Piekut 2016) it allows for.
The aim of the paper is to demonstrate how this information specifically can greatly enrich the process of close reading, and consequently result in a much more comprehensive analysis; to that end, during my presentation I will briefly discuss a number of selected examples.
20.
Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games      room 204.
12:00 – 12:30   Paratext as Methodology: Highlighting and Obscuring Game Phenomena.
By Jan Švelch Tampere University          Originally deployed to decentralize the role of the main text in literary criticism (Genette 1982, 1987), paratext has taken on new life in other fields of scholarly inquiry, including game studies.
Since its first use in Aarseth’s Cybertext (1997), the term has been applied to various game-related phenomena, often in ways that contradict Genette’s original conceptualization.
While its main mission – to highlight previously overlooked elements of game cultures – is shared among the various approaches, the scope of paratext has been both expanded and reduced as I have discussed in my dissertation (Švelch 2017).
Currently, three markedly different paratextual frameworks can be identified, including a version that relatively closely follows Genette’s definition (see Galloway 2012; Švelch 2016; Backe 2018).
However, the most influential approach (71%), based on a citation analysis of 197 game studies texts published between 1997–2018, builds on Consalvo’s (2007) interpretation of the concept.
This version opens up the term to cultural phenomena created by players, journalists, and other parties external to video game production, which would fall outside of Genette’s framework.
In this perspective, streaming, reviews, or walkthroughs all become paratextual due to their unquestionable impact on video game culture.
On the other side of the spectrum is the reduced framework inspired by the work of Wolf (2006) and adapted to the video game context by Rockenberger (2014).
According to this approach, paratextual elements are not only limited by having to be authored by video game creators, but also by spatial proximity to the game (e.g.
introductory sequences, menus).
The aim of this talk is not to police the use the concept of paratext but to show how each of these frameworks highlights certain phenomena, but in turn also obscures others.
The different approaches have clear methodological implications, which influence how we can talk about video games.
20.
Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games      room 204.
16:00 – 16:30   Player Agency in Audience Gaming.
By Can Mert Bozkurt Cologne Game Lab | Sandbox Interactive, Rüdiger Brandis Cologne Game Lab | University of Göttingen | Flying Sheep Studios          With the advent of broadband network infrastructures, video streaming services such as Youtube and Twitch.tv have become the dominant source of multimedia consumption.
As these platforms have matured, the community and its ensuing culture gave birth to a new generation of providers, initially as commercial live feeds, then as adult entertainment and game streams later on.
These live video streams allow the audience to interact directly with the performer and talk among themselves through chat widgets.
We call the live playing of a game in front of an interacting audience Audience Gaming.
Present research focuses mainly on why people watch others play, their socio-cultural characteristics, how they form communities and the performers’ motivations and approaches [Gandolfi, 2016].
However, newly developing affordances of interactivity of the streaming platforms such as straw polls, donation messages and stream integrated games are not well researched.
Audience Gaming is a result of the newly formed streaming culture.
It influenced the production of games such as DEAD CELLS [2018], where the audience can vote on what will come out of an in-game chest or HEARTHSTONE [2014], where Twitch.tv viewers can get in-depth information on an ongoing game: Similar to theatre in modern times, the spectators have become participants [Scully-Baker et al., 2017].
In comparison to classical multiplayer experiences focussing on a fair and balanced gaming experience, an audience-focused gaming setting is infused with a more complex power dynamic between the streamer or performer and audience.
While streamers are forced to accommodate their viewers or face their reactions they also hold ultimate control over game and chat.
We will define these new affordances and the change in player agency by analyzing the performative processes arising from audience gaming streams with games that offer direct audience participation like the aforementioned DEAD CELLS and DARWIN PROJECT [2018].
20.
Nov | Games Studies Summit: Paratextualizing Games      room 204.
16:15 – 16:45   From Asteroids to Architectoids.
Close Encounters Between Architecture and Game Design.
By Ulrich Götz Zurich University of the Arts           The gaming industry dedicates entire research departments to the development of its scenarios, which are based on examples from architecture and urban planning.
But even though the industry spends millions on exploring realistic qualities, most elaborate productions merely offer a montage of selected, formal fragments, which may be indebted to a composition of the real, but which fail to stage its inner logic.
At the same time, amazingly few game productions dedicate themselves to their own research on spatial qualities in the virtual.
The architectural perspective, on the other hand, shows increasing interest in game design, but neglects to even perceive the sets of rules that exist there.
However, without this prerequisite it is impossible to reveal the relationship between functional conditions and spatial order in game spaces.
Architecture and urban planning are becoming aware of game engines and of augmented or virtual realities, but they mostly use such technologies for illustrations with glossy renderings.
Compared to architectural designs from decades ago, such contributions are far from opening themselves to narrative and utopian qualities.
The frequently assumed proximity between architectural spaces in reality and their virtual counterparts in video games is based on false assumptions.
It is grounded on a selective and superficial discussion, which overlooks the thematic core of the other discipline, while the graphic output obscures the potential of virtual reality as a fantastic medium.
Misinterpretations and misunderstandings, but also creative lethargies define the image that the developers of real and virtual space have of one another.
At the same time, the results of photorealistic representations are so impressive that they become guiding images in the discussion of how space can even be depicted at all.
A strange hybrid arises from the use of functionless bits and pieces of the respective other discipline: if real constructions are called “architecture,” these results could instead be described as “architectoids”.
The talk references the publication “Architectonics of Game Spaces.
The Spatial Logic of the Virtual and Its Meaning for the Real.”, edited by Andri Gerber and Ulrich Götz.
20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
10:00 – 10:30   Narrative Design and the World of The Gardens Between.
By Brooke Maggs Narrative Designer | Remedy Entertainment          Narrative design gives context and meaning to the play experience by combining story structure with game mechanics, while keeping an eye on every other aspect of the game such as the world, animation and sound design.
The Gardens Between is a premium title with no text or speech and has been lauded as a ‘beautiful story of childhood friendship’ (Engadget) and has a calm, time-bending puzzle design that ties into the environments.
This talk will discuss the origins of The Gardens Between, key lessons learned and how story structure allowed for narrative cohesion, and the challenges of making a game where the environment, gameplay and story are intrinsically linked.
20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
15:00 – 15:30   Worldbuilding for Social VR: Lessons learnt from exploring VRChat.
By Rikke Jansen VR Artist and developer          From inside the weird and wonderful world of VRChat we will explore ways to create spaces for Social VR, discuss the different kinds of spaces, and go through some tips and common pitfalls.
20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
10:30 – 11:00   Get Lost.
– Learning History on Site with an App (Or Not).
By Katharina Tillmanns Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences          This session will provide insights in the creation of “Porta Pretoria C.
C.
A.
A.” – a Mixed Reality Location-based time-travel game, that teleports users 2000 years back to the first-century Roman Cologne.
We will discuss didactic design decisions, technological implications and will address perspectives for the future development from prototype to public game.
20.
Nov | Game Development Summit: Strange Worlds – About Spatial Experiences in Digital Games.
15:00 – 15:30   “To help ensure as authentic an experience as possible”: Selling Authenticity through Video Game Paratexts.
By Esther Wright University of Warwick          Claims of “authenticity” are widely found in the promotional surround of historical video games, and are often met with positive, or viscerally negative, responses from fans and potential players.
This paper uses Rockstar Games as a case study to explore the ways in which the promotional materials for historical video games are paratextual sites at which game developers perform the role of “developer-historian” (Chapman, 2016), and in doing so, attempt to create expectations for the authenticity of their products.
When promoting the release of titles that seek to represent specific moments of America’s past – such as the Red Dead Redemption franchise (2010-2018) and L.
A.
Noire (2011) – Rockstar created a number of different types of promotional materials that made explicit claims for their authenticity: ranging from blog posts and downloadable content hosted on the official Rockstar website, to trailers and exclusive features with select outlets of the gaming and entertainment press.
One the one hand, this involved curating a discrete, consumable narrative out of the broader history of American popular culture, to create a discourse of cinematic authenticity around the release of these games (Wright, 2017).
Complementing this, paratexts also worked to create a discourse of historical authenticity which used select pieces of evidence to suggest that their games were capturing certain ‘truths’ about the American West, or the post-war experience of urban spaces like Los Angeles.
This paper will explore what kind of material was used to do so, what these narratives added up to, and ultimately, what it tells us about the way notions of historical authenticity are discursively constructed outside of historical video games themselves.
20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past      room 211.
15:45 – 16:15   Playing „History as it really was“ – The Myth of Historical Accuracy in video games and its ideological functions.
By Eugen Pfister Bern University of the Arts          While there are many possible futures, there can only be one past.
We therefore believe that it is the work of the historians to unearth this one past, to reconstruct it and teach us about it.
In this logic it should therefore be possible to recreate this one historical past in video games for us to relive it.
This is at least what some marketing divisions try to sell us.
The truth is however, that every generation has its own history, its own past.
Our actual view on the Mediaeval Ages differs profoundly from history text books of the 1950s, and not so much because of new evidence but because of our changed interests in the past.
History has always been a profoundly ideological subject.
It is commonly instrumentalized by political actors to prove that their agenda is validated by the past, especially from a conservative point of view.
This also happens in our popular culture and more specifically in video games.
History functions as a „myth“ according to Roland Barthes on a subconscious level.
The myth is a sign – a statement, which presents an ideology as if it were a ‘natural’ – therefore unchallenged – condition of the world.
It perpetuates a distinct idea of society that adheres to political, cultural and social discourses.
Consequently, these myths are reproduced and received unconsciously in video games, nevertheless functioning as instruments of political socialization.
20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past      room 211.
10:45 – 11:15   The Ludic Aesthetics of Historical Description: Simulation Styles and Epistemology.
By Adam Chapman University of Gothenburg          Historical themes remain amongst the most popular for videogames, with hugely successful series such as Assassin’s Creed, Red Dead Redemption and Civilization heralding the arrival of a new widespread form of popular history.
In response, the nascent historical game studies field has begun to explore the use, possibilities and limitations of the videogame as a historical form.
Yet there is still much work to be done if we are to fully comprehend exactly how games work as historical epresentations in comparison to other media.
As such, establishing an understanding of the ludic aesthetics of historical description is an important task.
Based on ideas established in Digital Games as History (Chapman 2016), this paper attempts to contribute to this line of inquiry by exploring the role of varying simulation styles in historical games.
This is achieved by offering a framework organized around a spectrum bookended by two categories of simulation style: ealist and conceptual.
The paper explains the differing structural and functional characteristics of these categories of simulation style in historical games as well as exploring their strengths, weaknesses and predispositions in terms of historical representation.
Furthermore, the framework accounts for the epistemological implications of these simulation styles, arguing that whilst the realist simulation style has a tendency towards reconstructionist epistemological approaches, the conceptual, by comparison, tends towards constructionist epistemologies.
Finally, examples of hybridised historical games that function through occupying varying points on the spectrum between these categories are explored.
Ultimately, the paper seeks to offer a comprehensive framework that can account for the ludic aesthetics of historical description at play in a wide variety of historical games.
20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past      room 211.
10:15 – 10:45   History in Videogames and the Craze for the Authentic.
By Angela Schwarz University of Siegen           Authenticity seems to be the new watchword.
People seem to crave for the authentic, the authentic experience almost everywhere, especially on all levels of mediated reality and consumption, be it food, dress fashion or the latest TV-show with celebrities or those who wish to be one using various media-to let the public into their private homes and lives (actually what is staged as such).
Expectations of authentic experiences are just as high when directed towards present-day lives as they are towards encounters with the past.
Regardless of whether people stroll around an open-air museum or are chauffeured through ‚historical parts‘ of the town, whether they watch a historical drama on TV or play a videogame with a historical setting: The expectation of authenticity, allowing for the highest degree of immersion, is always present.
The talk is to discuss the meaning of authenticity of the past in videogames, seen against this background of a general craze for the authentic today.
What does authenticity actually mean: for game-developers and within the game, for gamers, for the media in general.
Does authenticity correspond with realism in a game.
The talk will present categories or patterns of staging authenticity in videogames in order to show the variety of history(ies) they already provide and the needs they actually fulfill.
20.
Nov | History in Games Summit: Contingencies of an Authentic Past      room 211.
14:00 – 15:00   Digital Games and Teacher Training.
By Thorsten Junge Ludwigsburg University of Education, Claudia Schumacher TU Kaiserslautern, Distance and Independent Studies Center (DISC)          Since 2017, we have been offering the seminar „Digital Games in the Educational Context“ for all teacher training courses at the Pädagogische Hochschule Ludwigsburg.
After a theoretical introduction, students familiarize themselves with digital games that are suitable for use in the educational context.
In a longer group work phase, they then develop a lesson concept to a computer game.
The concepts must have a clear reference to the education plan, the target group must be clearly defined (school type, grade level, subject) and the desired learning objectives must be specified.
So far only a few students had extensive previous knowledge.
But at the end of the course, most were convinced of the educational potential of digital games.
But it remains unclear whether this medium can actually be used in schools.
As part of the conference, we will discuss our experiences and present selected lesson concepts.
room 106 (ifs).
11:00 – 11:45   Keynote: Navigation Behaviour of Young Children in Tablet Applications.
By Jasmin Bastian University of Mainz, Stefan Aufenanger University of Mainz           Looking at the public as the scientific debate, there is a controversial discussion about the use of digital media in early childhood.
While one side vehemently argues against smartphones and tablets, the other side sees no greater risk for children from the age of two onwards, if they use digital media appropriately.
The latter even argue that certain applications could be well used by children 18 months and older.
The question that arises from developmental psychology as well as from media education is whether children in or from this age on are able to use applications on a computer and tablet sensibly at all.
We will present an experimental study about the navigation behaviour in tablet applications of children aged between two and six years.
The children were presented with both known and unknown applications.
Their navigation behaviour was recorded by screen recording, video recording and eye tracking.
In addition, the children were asked about their understanding of the application.
Their use of media in a family context was determined through oral interviews with a parent.
The research question relates to the public and professional discussion as to the age at which children can use digital media sensibly and develop an understanding of its contents.
The first results with eight children from the age group mentioned above show that younger children are already able to develop a good understanding and appropriate navigation behaviour.
room 106 (ifs).
10:15 – 11:00   Keynote: Children and Virtual Reality.
By Dylan Yamada-Rice Royal College of Art           In this presentation, I will share some of the insights I have gained from undertaking various research projects about children and Virtual Reality.
Specifically, I will draw on three studies in this area and share key findings that have specific implications for how we design and think about this technology for younger users.
The first is a commercially funded project, undertaken as part of my work for Dubit (https://www.dubitlimited.com/) a company specialising in strategy, research and development of digital media for children.
The study known as the CVR report (http://childrenvr.org/) was undertaken at the dawn of this latest wave of VR, and provides initial insight into how children interact with a range of virtual content on both low and top-end Head Mounted Displays.
This study also provides insights into health and safety aspects of using VR with under 12-year-olds.
The presentation will then go on show how the CVR study provided some interesting insight into the role of physical materials in children’s virtual play.
This will lead to sharing details of a second project that was part of a large-scale EU study on how children can use makerspaces and Fablabs to create with and for VR.
This was a collaborative study with Glück Workshops and Vaikai in Berlin, as part of the wider MakEY project (https://makeyproject.eu/).
Finally, I will share some insights from my most recent AHRC/ ESRC funded network which has been exploring location-based VR experiences for children in the UK and Japan.
References: -Yamada-Rice, D., Mushtaq, F., Woodgate, A., Bosmans, D, Douthwaite, A, Douthwaite, I, Harris, W, Holt, R, Kleeman, D, Marsh, J, Milovidov, E, Mon Williams, M, Parry, B, Riddler, A, Robinson, P, Rodrigues, D, Thompson, S and Whitley, S, (2017), Children and Virtual Reality: Emerging Possibilities and Challenges.
Avaliable online at http://childrenvr.org.
-Yamada-Rice, D., Rodrigues, D.
& Zubrycka, J.
(in press) Makerspaces and Virtual Reality Chapter 9.
In: Marsh, J.
Enhancing digital Literacy and Creativity.
Routledge UK-Japan VR Network: https://ukjapanvr.wordpress.com/           room 106 (ifs).
15:15 – 16:45   The multiplayer arcade table “Kuti”.
A game design and learning environment and example for face-to-face video gaming.
By Kolja Bopp Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Ralf Hebecker Hamburg University of Applied Sciences          The multiplayer arcade table“Kuti” emerged 2016 from the “Games Master” program at the University of Applied Sciences in Hamburg.
In our presentation we will explain the ideas behind it and our findings since its inception.
Kuti has been an intriguing challenge for game design students and a robust play and learn environment for all ages.
Recently we extended our research into collaborative gaming for the platform and into teaching frameworks for game design and development for children.
Our presentation will unveil why bar arcades got more than just a few things right, why most digital games are way too complex, how different games for two players facing each other need to be and how teaching children the basics of programming with a game also might look like.
room 106 (ifs).
15:15 – 16:45   Participatory Games Development in Political Education.
By Max Neu Landesverband Kinder- und Jugendfilm Berlin e.
V.
With the Game EZRA, a professional team of game designers, programmers and media educators desigend a game, in a full participatory process, that gives 3rd-6th graders the opportunity to deal with possibilities of political participation in the modern democratic society.
The main focus in the production process was, and is, to design a highly believable game, to reach kids from several minority groups that have low identification with the democratic system and governmental institutions.
room 106 (ifs).
15:15 – 16:45   Junait – a digital literacy game that works like a social network.
By Konstantin Kaiser planpolitik          “Junait” simulates a social network und enables schoolchildren (age 8-12) to get to know its features and threats in a playful and encouraging way.
This educational game works as a browser-based web-application and can be facilitated by teachers and educators independently and free of cost.
Junait uses a narrative in which the players must secure the social network to prevent the antagonist Dr.
Virus from stealing their personal data.
Junait has three main learning objectives: 1.) Becoming aware of sensitive personal Data 2.) Protection against the approaches of strangers 3.) Strengthening the reaction capabilities against unpleasant behavior of other members.
Junait is facilitated almost daily in Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Austria.
Please find more information on the project (careful it’s all in german) at: www.junait.de          room 106 (ifs).
15:15 – 16:45   Be my hero – facing traditional stereotypes in video games.
By Romina Nölp Socialworker and media educator for the district Oberpfalz          Children are often confronted with stereotypical hero figures when consuming media.
In the „Media Heroes“ workshop, children learn how their favourite characters are portrayed in the media and which characteristics make up a real hero beyond stereotypes.
Together they create their own avatars (heroes) with computer game engines and create stories in which they can be heroes themselves and discuss about different features and benefits.
The children then create their own adventure stories with the free Twine tool based on CSS programming language.
This enables them to develop their own stories beyond existing stereotypes and to get first impressions of the world of programming and coding.
room 108 (ifs).
15:15 – 16:45   Play Digital in Kindergarten.
By Erich Schönbächler University College of Teacher Education Vienna, Katharina Mittlböck University College of Teacher Education Vienna          We are talking about a concept of dealing with media for young children in creative ways.
It is based on the principles of Universal Design for Learning and on DECAL, an inclusive approach facing Different Education, Culture, Abilities and Languages of children.
Dealing with media in a playful, creative and researching way should allow even young children to construct their individual ways of learning, of applying and practicing their knowledge, and of emotional engagement.
In applying this concept, we are developing a training course for Kindergarten Teachers together with the biggest Kindergarten-provider in Vienna.
room 108 (ifs).
15:15 – 16:45   Diversity, Inclusion and Empowerment – the educational Potentials of Esports.
By Natalie Denk Danube University Krems          The rising enthusiasm centered around esports and streaming as well as the enormous motivational potential that resonates around gaming as part of the youth culture, can offer a significant contribution to the educational sector – at school as well as in youth work.
Within an educational framework, not only can the many skills and abilities that go hand in hand with gaming be fostered, but also essential aspects of gaming culture, such as issues related to gender and diversity, cooperation and social inclusion can be addressed.
The talk provides insights into the first Austrian esports school league, which was implemented in spring 2019 with almost 300 students from the Viennese district Floridsdorf and discusses the associated opportunities and challenges.
Furthermore, the talk will focus on the question of how esports in schools can contribute to a more gender-inclusive gaming culture.
room 108 (ifs).
14:00 – 15:00   Researching Digital Games: Informal Learning and Analyzing Learning Potentials.
By Christian T.
Toth Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz          We are analyzing digital games with regard to eight aspects: (1) growth of knowledge, (2) strategic and analytical thinking, (3) creativity, (4) memory, (5) concentration, (6) communicational abilities, (7) transmission of values and norms and (8) motoric abilities.
The projects’ goal is to assess a games’ pedagogical value to develop recommendations, guidelines and learning materials to foster learning with and through digital games in schools and at home.
This submission will briefly present the project and focus on our analysis concerning children up to the age of 12, as well as preview first results of our research.
The difficulties and challenges of researching digital games will be addressed alongside our thoughts on what role smartphones and tablets may play in learning with digital games in schools.
room 106 (ifs).
14:00 – 15:00   Third graders interpret the perspectives of ludonarrative characters.
On the potential of using narrative digital games for literary learning.
By Katharina Düerkop University of Bremen          Katharina Düerkop presents case studies from her dissertation project Literary Learning with Ludonarratives.
It explores the potential of using characters from narrative digital games to promote literary competencies – especially the interpretation of these characters’ perspectives – and aims to explain the respective learning processes.
Against the background of data from three design research cycles in classroom settings, Katharina discusses how two third graders perceive characters from the point and click adventure The whispered World (Daedalic Entertainment 2014) in the context of literary learning and how their understanding of these characters develops in relation to specific learning activities based on this game.
room 108 (ifs).
14:00 – 15:00   More than a Morality Meter.
Analyzing Models of Values in Games.
By Martin Hennig Universität Passau          Especially with regard to digital games, an ideology-critical perspective is complex, since different layers have to be considered and put in relation to each other.
Thus values and norms are represented on the levels of narration, game mechanics and visualization and their relation to each other would have to be examined.
Therefore, the workshop will present and discuss specific methods from Cultural Semiotics for value analysis.
After a general introduction to possible dimensions of analysis, this will be done using the example of interactive fairy tales.
The dialogue with researchers*, educators* and practitioners* will focus on the question of how to identify media specifics in the communication of values, deal with critical aspects and at the same time use the potential of digital games for the media education of children and adolescents.
room 108 (ifs).
21.
Nov | Main Conference Day.
The main day of the Clash of Realities will feature renowned speakers from all around the globe.
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09:15 – —   Registration opens.
Registration counter opens at the foyer of the Cinema Lecture Hall.
17:15 – 18:00   Adapting Assassin’s Creed for a wider audience; the Discovery Tour experience.
By Maxime Durand Ubisoft Montreal          How can a big blockbuster game be adapted for everyone, gamers and non-gamers alike.
Ubisoft believes it is possible to reuse the vast and immersive world of an action-adventure game to create a learning tool fit for a diverse audience.
Beyond the fantasy of using a videogame in a classroom, this adaptation requires massive work and compromises from its developers.
Maxime will run the audience through the objectives, constraints and success of creating the Discovery Tour experience.
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16:00 – 16:30   Coffee Break.
Coffee break.
15:15 – 16:00   Hamlet on the Analogue Holodeck: Alibi Design in Narrative Experiences.
By Johanna Koljonen Participation Design Agency           Participation Design Agency creates high end bespoke roleplaying experiences allowing participants to step into physically realized storyworlds as fully fledged characters.
Narrative design for larp centers on two core challenges: how to give participants a sense of total freedom, and how to give them the alibi – the social permission – to participate in activities, try experiences, or engage in playful behaviours that in their daily life they would not.
In this talk, Johanna Koljonen will discuss how these challenges are resolved, and the potential of the medium in relation to brand and IP activation, digital games writing and VR.
Among the case studies are a three day Hamlet at the actual Castle Elsinore, and a vampire diplomacy game played at the European Parliament with actual MEPs as participants.
.
14:30 – 15:15   Including Children in the Design of Play.
By Dylan Yamada-Rice Royal College of Art          How can design and play-based methods help children feed their ideas into the design of tech products.
How can kids and VR research be turned into physical prototypes and products.
Dylan provides examples of how research, design and development can marry up well.
Her presentation will address ideas around how children’s expertise about their own play interests and digital games designers’ knowhow can be better aligned in the design and development stage of new types of digital play.
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13:00 – 14:30   Lunch Break.
Lunch break          —.
12:15 – 13:00   Town Hall Talk.
By Isabela Granic Radboud University, Ian Bogost Georgia Institute of Technology, Gundolf S.
Freyermuth Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences          Town Hall Talk.
Moderated by Gundolf Freyermuth.
11:30 – 12:15   The Science of Identity Development: Principles and Practices for the Next Generation of Social Digital Design.
By Isabela Granic Radboud University          Currently, young people—having grown up with tablets in their cribs and phones in their high chairs—no longer experience their digital, online interactions and physical, offline ones as functionally distinct.
Instead, young people are living their everyday lives in a dynamic, ever-evolving digital environment that is woven together with offline experiences in a single hybrid ecosystem.
And yet most of psychological research simplifies this dynamic, hybrid time as “screen time” and tries to correlate it with mental health outcomes.
I will suggest an altogether different approach to both psychological research and digital design.
I start with the simple premise that to understand the impact of digital experiences on young people, we need to examine how their developmental needs and goals are met by these experiences.
Specifically, understanding how we build and share our narrative identity – the story about our self– can help pinpoint the digital experiences that will contribute to both healthy development as well as the emergence of serious mental health concerns.
I will show how this narrative identity framework provides a useful scaffold for integrating a broad range of design concerns that are emerging in the next generation of social digital experiences.
My hope is to provide digital designers with concrete scientific principles and practices for building hybrid experiences that tap and amplify our storytelling impulses.
If psychological scientists increasingly partner and participate in the development of the next iteration of digital tools of all kinds (games, social media platforms, VR/AR), we will have a better chance of providing young people with safe, enriching, identity-relevant online environments that feel authentic and relevant to their core needs and values.
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11:15 – 11:30   Coffee Break.
Short coffee break.
10:15 – 11:15   The Weird History of Windows Solitaire.
By Ian Bogost Georgia Institute of Technology          tba.
10:10 – 10:15   Introduction.
By Katharina Tillmanns Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences          Introduction and overview of the Main Conference Day.
10:00 – 10:10   10th Clash of Realities: Welcome.
By Gundolf S.
Freyermuth Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences, Björn Bartholdy Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences          Welcome & Introduction.
16:30 – 17:15   Quarry – Playground – Brand: Popular History in Videogames.
By Angela Schwarz University of Siegen           Nearly from the earliest beginnings, videogames have toyed with history.
They have done so for many reasons, with history being full of stories to be transferred into game plots, full of opportunities for players to enter into and interact with it as an attractive playground, and its potential to be turned into a recognizable feature allowing for the creation and marketing of games with historic settings as the key to branding.
The past that is showcased today has become remarkably diverse, not only in the range of historic events, characters, epochs covered but in the ways that these are presented through a game’s narration, visual, auditory and material features as well as its gameplay.
However, history in videogames today still has its shortcomings.
The history they present is popular history, much the same as that the audience encounters in other popular media.
Nonetheless, videogames can achieve much more than film, omic or other bestselling media due to their interactive qualities.
They can and hould be more adventurous in dealing with the past.
The keynote is to highlight the evolution of the games‘ usage of history to the present state of the art in this and to sensitize for their potential in simulating history as a process and in so doing in moving with the general trend even further away from mere facts towards an image of much more diverse, open (less linear) and controversial past realities.
Ömer Alkin.
Filmmaker & Media and Cultural Studies Scholar           Stefan Aufenanger.
University of Mainz           Björn Bartholdy.
Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences           Jasmin Bastian.
University of Mainz             Benjamin Beil.
University of Cologne           Rüdiger Brandis.
Cologne Game Lab | University of Göttingen | Flying Sheep Studios           Ian Bogost.
Georgia Institute of Technology           Kolja Bopp.
Hamburg University of Applied Sciences             Rogerio Augusto Bordini.
Offenburg University of Applied Sciences | Helmut Schmidt University           Nils Bühler.
University of Cologne           Ilja Burzev.
Freelance | Slow Bros.
Adam Chapman.
University of Gothenburg             Michael S.
Debus.
Independent Researcher           Natalie Denk.
Danube University Krems           Maxime Durand.
Ubisoft Montreal           Katharina Düerkop.
University of Bremen             Yasaman Farazan.
Independent Game Developer           Gundolf S.
Freyermuth.
Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences           Joachim Friedmann.
ifs – internationale filmschule köln           Jörg Friedrich.
Paintbucket Games             Isabela Granic.
Radboud University           Maddalena Grattarola.
Space Backyard           Arno Görgen.
Bern University of the Arts           Ulrich Götz.
Zurich University of the Arts             Ralf Hebecker.
Hamburg University of Applied Sciences           Martin Hennig.
Universität Passau           Federico Alvarez Igarzábal.
Institute for Frontier Areas of Psychology and Mental Health           Rikke Jansen.
VR Artist and developer             Thorsten Junge.
Ludwigsburg University of Education           Konstantin Kaiser.
planpolitik           Hayriye Kapusuz.
Istanbul University           Nina Kiel.
Freelance game developer and video games journalist             Johanna Koljonen.
Participation Design Agency           Mehmet Kosa.
Tilburg University           Martin Lorber.
Electronic Arts           Gunnar Lott.
Stay Forever             Brooke Maggs.
Narrative Designer | Remedy Entertainment           Gerhard Maier.
Journalist | Editor | co-founder Seriencamp | founder Plot           Katarzyna Marak.
Nicholaus Copernicus University           Curtis L.
Maughan.
Vanderbilt University             Can Mert Bozkurt.
Cologne Game Lab | Sandbox Interactive           Katharina Mittlböck.
University College of Teacher Education Vienna           Angus Mol.
Leiden University Centre for Digital Humanities | VALUE Foundation           Max Neu.
Landesverband Kinder- und Jugendfilm Berlin e.
V.
Carman Ng.
University of Bremen           Anh-Thu Nguyen.
University of Cologne           Romina Nölp.
Socialworker and media educator for the district Oberpfalz           Natali Panic-Cidic.
RWTH Aachen University             Eugen Pfister.
Bern University of the Arts           Milan Pingel.
Massive Miniteam           Franziska Schäfer.
Institute for Media Research and Media Education, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences           Christian Schmidt.
Stay Forever             Hanns Christian Schmidt.
Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences           Claudia Schumacher.
TU Kaiserslautern, Distance and Independent Studies Center (DISC)           Erich Schönbächler.
University College of Teacher Education Vienna           Angela Schwarz.
University of Siegen             Friederike Siller.
Institute for Media Research and Media Education, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences           Stefan H.
Simond.
Philipps-University Marburg           Vít Šisler.
Charles University           Jürgen Sleegers.
Institute for Media Research and Media Education, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences             Su-Jin Song.
Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences           Jan Švelch.
Tampere University           Katharina Tillmanns.
Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln – University of Applied Sciences           Christian T.
Toth.
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz             Ed Vollans.
University of Leicester           Miruna Vozaru.
IT University of Copenhagen           Leonie Wolf.
Flying Sheep Studios | Cube Factory GbR | Cologne Game Lab           Esther Wright.
University of Warwick             Dylan Yamada-Rice.
Royal College of Art           Felix Zimmermann.
a.r.t.e.s.
Graduate School for the Humanities Cologne                       Registration Speakers.
Register now!.
Registration Professionals.
Register now!.
Registration Students.
Register now!.
Team.
Program Board & Team Clash of Realities 2019                    Gundolf S.
Freyermuth.
Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln gsf(at)colognegamelab.de             Benjamin Beil.
University of Cologne benjamin.beil(at)uni-koeln.de             Hanns Christian Schmidt.
Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln hcs(at)colognegamelab.de.
Björn Bartholdy.
Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln bb(at)colognegamelab.de             Nina Kiel.
Freelance game developer and video games journalist nina(at)ninakiel.de             Joachim Friedmann.
ifs internationale filmschule köln J.
Friedmann(at)filmschule.de             Franziska Schäfer.
Institute for Media Research and Media Education of TH Köln franziska.schaefer(at)th-koeln.de             Jürgen Sleegers.
Institute for Media Research and Media Education of TH Köln juergen.sleegers(at)th-koeln.de             Friederike Siller.
Institute for Media Research and Media Education of TH Köln friederike.siller(at)th-koeln.de             Martin Lorber.
Electronic Arts mlorber(at)ea.com.
Felix Zimmermann.
a.r.t.e.s.
Graduate School for the Humanities Cologne post(at)felix-zimmermann.net             Su-Jin Song.
Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln sjs(at)colognegamelab.de             Judith Ruzicka-Grote.
Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln Project & Event Management jr(at)colognegamelab.de +49 221 8275 4059             Tobias Lemme.
Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln Project & Event Management tl(at)colognegamelab.de +49 221 8275 4044             Alexandra Hühner.
Cologne Game Lab, TH Köln Administration arh(at)colognegamelab.de +49 221 8275 3069                     Clash of Realities at gamesweekberlin.
Since 2018 the conference has expanded its network and collaborated with the  A MAZE.
/ Berlin – International Games and Playful Media Festival as well as the  Quo Vadis – game development & business conference, both integral parts of gamesweekberlin.
Studying Games  Clash of Realities at Quo Vadis [ more]  Game Design as Gardening  Clash of Realities at A.
MAZE [ more]                  Contact | Press.
TH Koeln Cologne Game Lab (Conference Location) Schanzenstraße 28 51063 Köln Germany Press Contact: Tobias Lemme Email: tl(at)colognegamelab.de Phone: +49 221 8275 – 4044 For further questions and information concerning the Clash of Realities Conference please contact us below.
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